Fried Green Tomatoes: Conjuring Fannie Flagg


Tomatoes. At the beginning of the season, when they just start ripening and nothing tastes better than a fresh tomato right off the vine, we can’t get enough of them. Fast forward to October, when the vines are still full of green tomatoes refusing to turn red or yellow. What to do?

A friend dropped off a bag of green tomatoes recently. I asked the Pie Man if he wanted to bake a green tomato pie. He snorted. Really. And then he reminded me of the last time he baked one. It was, he said awful. Might be because Pie Man tries to decrease the sugar in most of his baked goods. That might work in other fruits, but apparently not with green tomatoes.

So…what to do with the tomatoes? Long ago, back in the day when we had a huge garden, I wrapped each green tomato in newspaper, as directed by my grandmother. Maybe I used the wrong newspaper, because it didn’t work. They all rotted. Not pretty.

This time I took the advice of my big brother. I lined them up on a windowsill where they’d get some sun. This is how they looked when they first arrived.photo(8)

 

 

 

 

 

And now….10 days later…one yellow tomato is ready to be eaten, a red one is almost there, and another yellow on the way!

image(1)

 

 

 

 

The rest of the tomatoes? If they don’t ripen soon, we’ll go the route of Ruth, Idgie and the rest of the regulars at the Whistle Stop Cafe in Fannie Flagg’s “Fried Green Tomatoes.”

What would you do with them?

 

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3 responses to “Fried Green Tomatoes: Conjuring Fannie Flagg

  1. Karen Pannabecker

    I’d probably try feeding them to the pigs but I guess that’s not an option for you. I know some people pickle them. I’ve never tried it but it sounds like a good idea.

    • Pannabecker Steiner Mary

      Yep…if I had pigs….That’s the recipe I’ve been trying to remember! I heard a podcast about pickling them and couldn’t remember it. Now if I can just remember the podcast….might have been KCRW Good Food.

  2. Pingback: Fresh Tomatoes for Winter | The Art & Science of Gardening

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