Tag Archives: Dough

Second time around: homemade crackers

Awhile back some dough that was intended to become a loaf of bread instead morphed into crackers because I’d forgotten to add yeast. And they were good.

Today, though, I had a plan. Homemade crackers were on the agenda. I’d consulted my ancient edition of Prescription for Nutritional Healing, searching for some ideas for foods to eat to reduce pain and inflammation. I knew about the healing properties of flax seed and that it has some analgesic properties. It’s also a good source of Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids, which are thought to promote cardiovascular health.

Having stocked up on flax seed, I searched for a cracker recipe and found one in a blog by Tracy Carolyn.

Her recipe, Whole Wheat Flax Seed Crackers, also incorporated sesame seeds. But as usual, I have to make changes. So I substituted white wheat flour for the white flour and added some rosemary and thyme, both from my garden, and set about creating. My version of the recipe follows the photos.0303131158

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Whole Wheat/Flax/Sesame/Wheat Germ Crackers
2/3 c. whole wheat flour
2/3 c. white wheat flour
1/3 c. flax seeds
1/6 c. sesame seeds
1/6 c. wheat germ
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
3 tbsp. olive oil
3/4 c. water

In a medium bowl, mix together flours, flax weed, sesame seeds, wheat germ, salt and baking powder. Add the oil and stir until combined. Add the water and stir to come and create the dough. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead four to five times. Divide into eight equal pieces, cover with a tea towel and allow to rest for 15 minutes.

Preheat oven to 450 (my oven doesn’t register correctly, so I set it for 425). On a lightly floured surface, roll out one piece of dough to 1/16-inch and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet (I use a silicone baking mat). Bake on the middle rack of the oven for five to six minutes, then flip and bake for an additional two to three minutes or until golden brown. Remove from the oven and place on a cooling rack. When cool, break into desired pieces.

Note: Baking times will vary with actual thickness of dough and oven temperature, so watch them carefully.

Also: I like the unusual shapes of broken crackers, but you could score them before baking to produce consistent size/shapes.
Store in airtight container for up to two weeks — if they last that long.

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Oooooops Crackers

As I headed out to yoga, I took one last peek at the bread dough rising in a bowl on the register. Looked great and smelled great. Two hours later when I got home, the dough appeared to (a) not have risen at all, or (b) risen and fallen. I was pretty sure it was (a).

A little thought niggled at the back of my mind. What had I done wrong? Smack to the forehead….of course….no yeast. As any self-respecting baker knows, bread won’t rise without some sort of leavening agent.

As I stood there, berating myself for being careless (s0 much for that hour of restorative yoga), my husband saved the day. He would make crackers with the dough. Which he did. And they are scrumptious.

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This was intended to be whole wheat bread with seven grain and flax seeds. I’d mixed the dough in the bread machine to save time. So the recipe is written for a bread machine. If you were mixing it up by hand, you’d proof the yeast first by mixing it with the water, then adding the dry ingredients.

7-Grain/Flax/Whole Wheat Bread
(AKA Oops Crackers)
1 1/2 c. warm water
1 1/2 tbsp. olive oil
1 tbsp. honey
1 tsp. salt
1 c. white whole wheat flour
2 1/2 c. whole wheat flour
1/4 c. 7-grain
1 tbsp. flax seed (or more)
1 tbsp. yeast (I use bulk yeast)
Set bread machine on dough cycle. When it completes the cycle, remove and place in an oiled bowl, turn dough over a few times to coat with oil, then cover bowl and set in warm place to rise.

After a few hours, remove dough and place in oiled bread pan, let rise f0r 40 minutes or so, then bake at 350 for 30-40 minutes. (This is an estimate, since everyone’s oven is different.)

NOTE: IF YOU FORGET THE YEAST or if you just want to make crackers, you can skip the yeast and they’ll turn out fine.

Roll out the dough and fit into cookie sheets. Score with a knife, poke holes with a fork. Sprinkle with salt, garlic salt, sesame seeds, or whatever you like, and bake at 300 for 10-15 minutes. (Again, this will depend on your oven.) Let cool if you can stand to wait. Otherwise, eat them!

Filling the bread drawer takes unexpected turn

Our bread drawer was nearly empty today so I decided it was time to stir up the sourdough and bake some bread. My plan did not include making crackers or pizza dough, but…well…things happen.

Just an FYI for the uninformed: In the “olden” days, a bread drawer was usually made of tin, with holes punched in the lid for airflow. The purpose is to store bread safely and keep it fresh.

When we looked this house, one of the things I fell in love with immediately was the fact that it has two built-in tin bread drawers…just like the one in the house I grew up in.

This is what ours looks like. See? It’s empty.

So..back to the bread. Using some of the sourdough, I mixed up one of my favorite blends — whole wheat flour, cracked wheat, flax seeds, and white flour. While kneading it, I remembered that I could have used the Cuisinart for this part.

I put the dough in a big bowl to rise. Plenty pleased with myself, I went off to do something else. Oddly, when I checked the dough, it hadn’t risen. At all. Of course, that’s when I remembered what I should never forget. Yeast.  Unlike my big brother’s sourdough, mine doesn’t provide enough rising action so I have to add yeast. Except I forgot.

My husband reminded me that he did that once and baked it anyway. He thought it tasted okay. I considered that option, but decided I wasn’t up for unleavened bread. But..all was not lost. Crackers don’t need yeast, so we rolled half of it out for crackers and stuck the other half in the freezer for thin crust pizza.

That didn’t solve the empty bread drawer so I swiped more of the sourdough and mixed up another batch of bread. This time I cheated and let the bread machine do the kneading (it’s easier to clean than the Cuisinart).

I know what you’re thinking. Why doesn’t she toss the Cuisinart pieces in the dishwasher? We don’t have a dishwasher. Never have and according to the hubs, never will. Guess who does the dishes? Not me.

But we do have two tin bread drawers. And now they’ll both be full — one with crackers and one with bread.